Jacques Cartier Bridge

Occasionally, Montreal gets sunshine and great weather when it’s meant to be snowing. When that happens, it’s good to go out and see new parts of the city, such as the Jaques Cartier Bridge.
Montreal being a city located on the shore of one of the world’s largest rivers was bound to have an impressive bridge or two. The Jaques Cartier is one of the most imposing, connecting the city to the South Shore of the river and its suburbs.
The views from the bridge are majestic, especially on a clear day.

If you’re planning a stroll over the bridge, the pedestrian side is on the East side, whilst the West is for bikes. The start of the bridge is near to Papineau Metro station, which is on the Green Line.
Looking North-East over the city.
The two humps of the bridge visible in the distance.

Looking East down Sainte-Catherine.

The mountain lurks in the distance.
No idea what this building is, but it looks impressive situated in its own ground beneath the bridge.
Evidently, there were too many suicides from the bridge, so the federal government put up railings. Sadly, they do obscure the view a little.

The beginning of the first hump.

Claustrophobic?
Rail yards beneath the bridge. Montreal seems to be littered with railway track, but not many train services for actual people.
The epic Saint Lawrence River, a river so wide that the French have a special word for it to distinguish it from regular sized rivers: fleuve.
Looking above.

The Saint Lawrence River again, with the Olympic Stadium in the distance.

A view of the road, which is one of the few bottlenecks for cars to get on and off the island of Montreal.

You can get vertigo looking up.
Silhouette on the river.

Clear skies above.
Sun.
La Ronde is an amusement park on Saint Helen’s Island.

Another view of La Ronde.

This bit was slightly creepy. Now half way between Montreal and Longueuil, to cross under the road we had to enter this portal. Underneath: a veritable labyrinth.
I hear that this building complex under the road, of which the upper level serves as a pedestrian subway, was penned to be a giant casino.

I get the feeling of urban decay down here.
Looking back over the bridge from a subterranean standpoint.

Looking back over the bridge again.
The road continues over another bridge to Longueuil and the South Shore.

The guy who got a bridge named after him.
Another view of the portal.

We left the bridge on Saint Helen’s island (a few photos of that here), where we were easily able to grab the Metro again at Jean-Drapeau, on the Yellow Line.
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